Share this:

Your business is a legal entity under the law. As a result, each type of organization and corporate structure has its own set of legal standards.

S corporations, C corporations, non-profit corporations, and limited liability companies (LLCs) are the four most common types of corporations mentioned.

 C-corporation

C corporation is a legal entity independent from its owners. Corporations can profit, pay taxes, and be held legally responsible.

C Corporations provide the best protection from personal liability for their owners, but they are more expensive to incorporate than alternative structures. Corporate record-keeping, operational processes, and reporting are also more extensive.

C Corporations pay income tax on their profits. Corporate profits are sometimes taxed twice: once when the company makes a profit and again when shareholders get dividends on their tax returns.

Corporations have a fully different existence from their shareholders. If a shareholder departs or sells his or her shares, the C corporation can continue to operate relatively unaffected. Corporations are an excellent option for medium- and higher-risk firms, as well as those that need to generate funds or plan to “go public” or be sold in the future.

Limited Liability Corporation (LLC)

You can benefit from the advantages of both the corporation and partnership company forms by forming an LLC. In most cases, LLCs protect your assets, such as your car, house, and savings accounts, from personal liability. If your LLC goes bankrupt or is sued, your assets, such as your car, house, and savings accounts are not at risk.

Profits and losses can be transferred to your account without incurring corporation taxes. Members of an LLC, on the other hand, are deemed self-employed and must pay self-employment taxes to Medicare and Social Security.

In many states, LLCs have a finite lifespan. When a member joins or leaves an LLC, several states may require the LLC to be disbanded and re-formed with new membership unless the LLC already has a buy-sell-and-transfer ownership agreement in place. LLCs are an excellent option for medium- and higher-risk firms, owners with large personal assets who want to safeguard them, and owners who wish to pay a lower tax rate than they would if they were in a corporation.

S-corporation

An S corporation, also known as an S corp, is a special type of corporation created to avoid the double taxation disadvantage that regular C corporations face. Profits and losses from S corporations can be transferred through to owners’ income without ever being subject to corporate tax rates.

Although not all states tax S corporations equally, the majority do so in the same way as the federal government and tax their shareholders proportionately. Some states tax S corporations on profits beyond a certain threshold, while others ignore the S corporation entirely, treating the company as a C corporation. S corporations must apply for S corporation status with the Internal Revenue Service, which is a different process than registering a business.

S corps has its own set of restrictions. S corporations are limited to 100 stockholders, all of whom must be citizens of the United States. You’ll still have to follow the C corporation’s strict filing and operational procedures.

 

Differences

S corps, like C corps, have an independent existence. If a shareholder departs or sells his or her shares, the S corporation can continue to operate relatively unaffected. S corporations are a suitable option for businesses that would otherwise be C corporations but meet the requirements to qualify as an S corporation.

Taxes are the most significant distinction between C and S businesses. C corporations pay tax on their earnings, and you, as an owner or employee, pay tax on your earnings. An S corporation does not have to pay any taxes. You and the other owners, on the other hand, record the company’s revenue as personal income. Taxes are the most significant distinction between C and S businesses. C corporations pay tax on their earnings, and you, as an owner or employee, pay tax on your earnings. An S corporation does not have to pay any taxes. You and the other owners, on the other hand, record the company’s revenue as personal income.

On their tax filings, most S Corps can deduct up to 20% of their business income. If you have an S Corp, you can deduct the losses from your business on your tax return.

When it comes to selecting how the firm will be operated and how the owner’s financial interests will be distributed, the LLC is the most flexible of all the business formations. It can also choose to be taxed as an S corporation or a C corporation rather than a partnership or sole proprietorship for income tax purposes, but a corporation cannot choose to be taxed as a partnership or sole proprietorship. Companies, on the other hand, may have an easier time obtaining outside money because certain investors and banks prefer to invest in corporations rather than LLCs.

Want to learn how to protect yourself as a real estate investor?

Learn everything you NEED to know with my new online training. Start your path to becoming a real estate pro today!
Share this: